Photoblog: Colour and Culture of Lisbon, Portugal

Lisbon is a city of vibrant colour and colour, heavily influenced by Art Nouveau style architecture. A perfect place to rest and explore after sailing down the Atlantic Coast.

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The Hill Tram Tour – used by locals and tourists alike

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At the end of the Hills Tram, this band was entertaining the passersby

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Art Nouveau style shop fronts are common and beautiful. This is a jewellery store founded in the late 1920’s whos facade features the Portuguese coat of arms

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We sat and watch this busker suspended in mid-air for ages

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Buildings full of colour

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In the Bairro Alto district, this Theatre was built in the mid 19th century

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If Portuguese tarts take your fancy, then Pasteis de Belem is the place to go but be prepared for the queue

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There’s a certain grittiness of the buildings in some areas that made this town intriguing

 

 


Let’s talk about plastic and sailing

Yes, this the latest “hot topic”. Everyone seems to be talking about single-use plastic; from plastic bags to plastic straws. Having spent several months in the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea, I can tell you, the problem is real. And it’s not pretty.

Plastic debris littered the water, beaches and shores, to various degrees, in every place we visited. The more popular and populated the anchorage, the more rubbish there was. We often saw plastic bottles, the remains of plastic bags, balloons, styrofoam and inflatables. There was even a plastic coverall floating in the Atlantic Ocean (alarmingly looking very much like a floating body). In Sicily, I pulled pieces of a partially disintegrated plastic bag from one of the propellers. Bays that looked so idyllic from the water had shores scattered with plastic and other rubbish. It was often a shock when the environment looked pristine from the boat. For example, the stunning bay we were anchored in (Solta, Croatia) above, had litter on the pebbled shore below. These were just quick random snapshots as examples of the shoreline.

The seabed, sadly, also was often littered with rubbish and remnant parts from boats and marinas.

While it may not be too surprising that where there are people, there is litter. What is surprising is that on ocean passages, miles from nowhere, we would still see a stream of plastic waste floating by.

I’ve become hyper-aware of the amount of plastic that surrounds any food bought from supermarkets, especially the processed foods. Everything from cheese to prosciutto to UHT milk. In many places in Europe, fresh fruits and vegetables are often placed in plastic bags to be weighed, priced and labelled before checkout. My experience of trying to change that practice was interesting and unsuccessful. Then there are the other items such as  shampoo and liquid soap containers, dishwashing and cloth washing liquid containers.

When you store your garbage, it becomes obvious how much single-use plastic you buy and discard. On an optimistic note, many marinas have implemented recycling and waste separation stations. Other sailors in the Med are actively picking up trash in their anchorages on particular days eg “Trash Tuesdays”, and taking it ashore for proper disposal.

I’ll be honest, this season I wasn’t prepared. No excuses, but we had a lot on our plates commissioning our boat. However, the things I did were:

– shop with a trolley and reusable bags

– use beeswax wrappers instead of cling wrap (they keep food fresher anyway)

– use reusable storage containers

– buy supermarket items in glass rather than plastic if there’s a choice

– recycle cardboard and bottles where possible

– picked plastic out of the water

Some of these things actually made life on board simpler and easier.

Could I do more? Absolutely, much more. So next year, I’ll be working on researching and trying products that reduce waste (including plastics) and are kinder to the environment in general. Some of these include:

– trying shampoo and soap bars with minimal or compostable packaging

– using reusable bags for fruit and vegetables (weighing and costing etc)

– increasing beeswax wrapper on board

– trying calico bags for storage of fresh fruit and vegetables

– shop in bulk when possible (especially for dry goods), this includes buying from the deli instead or prepackaged meats and cheeses

– using bamboo toothbrushes

– researching an eco-friendly alternative to clothes washing liquid

– declining plastic straws when ordering drinks

– using washable, cotton cleaning cloths

I’m sure there are many, many more actions I could take. Let me know if there are things you’ve done on your boat to be kinder on the environment while sailing. I’d love to hear about it.

 


Wild Heart waiting: La Rochelle and all things yachts

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A small part of Port des Minimes, the largest marina in France for pleasure boats. It’s also where a number of brands launch their yachts not only Fountaine Pajot but Amel yachts and Nautitech catamarans

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Boats and masts as far as you can see

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The entrance to the old port, where boats constantly leave and enter

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The historic architecture and rich history of the town sits side by side with the pleasure craft yachting lifestyle

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There are regattas and sailing schools a plenty.

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Wild Heart in the evening shortly before we left the marina

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When we arrived in La Rochelle, a few short months ago, we had no idea what to expect from many things; the town, our new catamaran “Wild Heart” and sailing in France.

We quickly discovered that La Rochelle was a joy, rich in history and lifestyle; commisioning a new boat was an intense and exciting experience; sailing in a new country was an adventure. In fact, it continues to be an adventure of exploring, discovering and learning.

Photograph credit: Scott Johnston

Where we stayed: Hotel St Nicolas La Rochelle

Low key hotel, in a convenient location in the old town and about 30 minutes walk to Port des Minimes

Where we ate:

We enjoyed all the local boulangeries and pâtisseries around the hotel. And any gelato shop, of course

As restaurants go, Prao Restaurant was one of our favourites for the fresh food, atmosphere and wine selection.

Shopping for the boat: Get our download here of all the places we shopped to “outfit” the boat.


A new catamaran and a different life.

There are times you make decisions that you know will change the path of your life.

Our catamaran purchase is one of these big, scary decisions.

Why big and scary? We have made a big commitment to a particular way of life. A life of 6 months sailing and 6 months at home in Austrlia. I know it will have its challenges. We are taking a leap into the big unknown and having to let go of things in our life now to make it possible; the comfortable, safe familiar things.

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